How to Grow Instagram Organically / Peter Lorimer - The Creative Entrepreneur Podcast

Greetings and welcome to the Creative Entrepreneur Podcast, I am your host Peter Lorimer, former hit record producer, now host of the show Stay Here on Netflix and owner LA’s most creative Boutique real estate firm, PLG Estates.

In this podcast I cover all things Instagram. While 20 minutes isn't quite long enough to get into everything there is (I could talk about this stuff all day), I do believe I cover quite a bit of useful information in this one!

Today, Instagram is not simply about having a curated lifestyle feed (although that is definitely still relevant). It's a sophisticated way for us to connect with our clients, and we'd be remiss to not recognize that or utilize these amazing features.

There are tons of apps that can help you use Instagram effectively, such as Iconosquare, Sprout Social, and Hootsuite (to name a few).
Also, within the Instagram app itself, there's some really powerful data. From collections to insights, there's so much you can do to prospect and determine what makes a powerful post for your audience.

A common misconception is that social media is something you "get to".

Social media IS your work. THIS is prospecting.

Let's get into this, friends. Here's this week’s episode of The Creative Entrepreneur.

 

Golden Nuggets from this episode:

[ 04:40] iconosquare App -> Available on iOS, Android and Desktop 

[05:07] Sprout Social App -> Available on iOS, Android and Desktop 

[05:39] Hootsuite App -> Available on iOS, Android and Desktop 

 [13:08] “To be successful in business now we need to be prospecting through social media we need to be using collections”

[14:12] “I am just a gatekeeper to ruining many hours of your life by you nerding out and getting into the guts of Instagram but if you do it if you take the time, you will flourish!”

[14:42] “Social media is your work this needs to be an integral part of what you do on a daily basis.”

 

Thanks for being here,

 ❤️ PL

What is the Best Time to Take Listing Photographs? - Magic Minute Season 3

I believe in putting everything you've got into everything you do. Trying to fit listing photos into a certain hour or two is a bit short-sighted. If I had to pick a time, I'd say noon.

I hire a photographer to come mid-afternoon and in the evening. Houses have different personalities depending on the time of the day.

Your sellers will love that you went the extra mile. Always be of service.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

What vacation renters really think about people’s homes (via Seattle Times)

If you are in the short-term rental business, it's time to shift your mindset. It's time to think about your AirBnB as a business, and it has to be incredibly evident that you care about your guests' experience when they stay there.

Seattle Times recently published an article on this topic, and I was much obliged to give my two cents. The article covered my favorite topics: marketing your AirBnB and setting it up for success (or, read: guest comfort and satisfaction).

There is a multitude of things you can do to improve your reviews and your guests' overall experience. But before you can do that, you must get them there. And that's where the marketing comes in. Invest in a professional photographer and possibly even a videographer. What's your rental's story? What's the narrative? Tell it well, and then outfit your rental accordingly.

The second most important factor of your rental (following the quality of accommodations) is amenities. Splurge on nice sheets, a professional cleaning between stays (this one's a must), and other amenities that go along with the narrative of your rental. Is your rental near family-friendly activities? Then you'll want to include snacks, games, and other kid activities. Is your rental near a National Park? Then maybe you'll include a park map, picnic basket, and sunscreen or bug spray.

Ultimately, the important thing to remember is this: you are hosting a guest, whether you're present or not. What can you add to - or, much of the time, take away from (granny couch, dirty carpet, etc) - your rental to ensure your guests feel like they are being taken care of, even though you're not there?

Original Article By Kim Cook The Associated Press

If you’re thinking of listing your home as a vacation rental, have a listen to what travelers say makes a space inviting and welcoming, and what’s a turnoff.

For starters, amenities and cleanliness matter.

“I would have loved better sheets and towels as well as decent soap and amenities,” says Carol VanderKloot of New York, who was underwhelmed by a recent Michigan rental.

Nice linens are mentioned often in online reviews. In a poll conducted by Airbnb this summer, travelers rating their vacation experience cared most about the quality of their accommodations, followed by amenities that are functional and thoughtful. So along with nice shampoo, consider a bottle of wine, a bicycle, scooter, sled or fully loaded beach bag.

A host in Los Angeles whose home is popular with young families stocks kids’ books. In Milan, Italy, a host with a pool set up Bluetooth speakers outside.

Focus on potential guests’ comfort, both in your décor and your marketing, says Peter Lorimer, a Los Angeles-based real estate expert.

He has teamed up with interior designer Genevieve Gorder on a new Netflix series, “Stay Here,” in which they help homeowners refurbish and redecorate their spaces to make them more attractive to visitors.

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“Massively bad for repeat business is dirt,” he warns. “After every guest there needs to be a cleaning plan. Look at this as an investment in your business; if a restaurant is dirty you’ll never go back, and it’s the same with short-term rental.”

Gorder notes that everyone has different standards for tidiness, so it’s best to go pro. “It has to look, feel and be CLEAN,” she says. “That means having a professional service handle your rental before and after each guest checks out. Your reviews will skyrocket and that’s worth its weight in gold.”

Get rid of stained or worn carpeting, refinish wood flooring, and lay fresh tile or new rugs. Provide several good mirrors, as well as storage, and a folder or notes on how to operate things. As Lorimer points out, “the last thing any guest wants is to try and figure out how to use the TV remote or turn the ceiling fan on and off.”

Consider including “insider” suggestions for what to do and where to go in the area. Displaying some local photography or artwork might pique curiosity and help you build a relationship with nearby shop owners.

Lorimer suggests drawing up a calendar of fun local events and posting it with your listing. Consider an incentive gift for longer stays, like a gift certificate for a local restaurant, or lift tickets at the ski hill.

Gorder warns against the “junk drawer” effect, where owners try to save by kitting out their rentals with dated furniture and hand-me-downs.

And keep the décor relatively neutral.

“Owners tend to decorate for themselves and how they live instead of for their guests,” she says.

“Home is in many ways a reflection of our most intimate selves. When you turn a property or a room in your home into a short-term rental, it’s time to shift your thinking.” The key is finding a balance: a space that’s neither too personal nor impersonal.

Renters differ about how much personal style they like in a space. VanderKloot enjoyed an array of vintage radios displayed on a shelf in a Michigan home, but appreciated not having kitschy décor in a rental in New Orleans. “The Scandinavian interior in that rental was a perfect counter-palette to the excess of [the city],” she says.

In an apartment in Copenhagen, New Yorker Darby Drake says she would have appreciated some personal touches. “What turned me off most was how bland everything was. It didn’t quite feel ‘lived-in,'” she says.

Invest in a standout piece or two, if you can. Drake fondly recalls a big, comfy, cowhide lounge chair in a different Copenhagen rental, as well as another great piece: “There was this massive gray bean-bag lounger that was wonderful. After a long day exploring the city, it was great to be enveloped by it.”

The lounger wasn’t shown in the online photos, Drake says. And that could have been a missed opportunity.

For the original article click HERE

Using Your Spiritual Compass to Succeed in Business | Pete Lorimer Mantra

Business and spirituality can co-exist, and here's my take on it.

👉 Steven Covey coined the term "abundance mindset" and it's something I live my life by today. I didn't use to. As a boy growing up in England, I learned to live by the scarcity theory: There's not enough money, jobs, etc., to go around... so I have to get MINE.

Abundance means there's MORE than enough for everyone on the planet. To share, without anything being removed from them. I really didn't hear much about this theory growing up, in the music industry, and in real estate.

It's a pretty wonderful thing. It took me a moment to adopt and I was fearful in the beginning. However, I've discovered something amazing: the more I give away, the more returns.

👉 We can't carry around resentment. Resentment is toxic, EVEN if it's "understandable" to some. If someone harms me, it's understandable, in this world, to harbor resentment. But I see it like this: resentment is a poison that I DRINK and then hope someone else dies. I counteract resentment by practicing something -- if someone wrongs me, I literally wish them every success in the world.

👉 I need to offer something in order to get something. What am I willing to give and what am I wanting in return?

Pinpoint what you want. I used to write down everything I wanted in my life in my little moleskin. I then wrote a contract. I said, for my part, I will give away anything and everything I know to anyone who wants to listen. In return, I'd like to hit these goals.

Four years later, I realized I hit all of them.

👉 You need to know that you deserve to succeed. We have to visualize our dreams and our goals. It's weird and it works. We must remain consistent with this. Keep your goals and dreams in your mind. It works if you work it. Remain in action and keep your dreams at the forefront of your mind.

Taste your dreams.

Here's how the universe rewards this: When you keep putting in the effort, the universe will hear it, and she will put in your hands what you need (not necessarily what you want).

Give away everything. Dinner always tastes better with friends.

Thanks for being here,

PL

Keynote Speech - Detroit C21 Exclusive | Backstage Pass | Peter Lorimer Vlog

I love Detroit and recently headed to this snowy (while I was there) city in Michigan, where I had the honor of being a keynote speaker for an exclusive brokerage event. I spoke on the most powerful marketing engine today, social media, and how it's still being underutilized.

Whatever your tribe is, you can cater to it. Find what you're interested in, and consistently put out engaging and valuable content related to it. Make this a priority, not something you'll eventually "get to later."

Think about it - as a business, you have the privilege of connecting with others on a meaningful level ALL while increasing your numbers. Don't leave this on the table, friends.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

How to Control the Outcome of Your Business / Peter Lorimer - The Creative Entrepreneur Podcast

Greetings and welcome to the Creative Entrepreneur Podcast, I am your host Peter Lorimer, former hit record producer, now host of the show Stay Here on Netflix and owner LA’s most creative Boutique real estate firm, PLG Estates.

When I was a little boy in England, my father said, "If you can find a job that you like, you are going to be happier than 98% of the population."

Here's what I see happening over and over again with young real estate agents and young men and women in other careers - they become miserable under the pressure to succeed; they become slaves to their careers and lifestyles. Why? Because they're rooted in the results. Friends, we can't control the outcome. The secret is learning to be happy, whatever the outcome. The ONLY thing you have control over is your actions.

There's freedom in this. It's about waking up every single day, busting our asses, and staying out of the results.

Let's get into this, friends. Here's this week’s episode of The Creative Entrepreneur.

 

Golden Nuggets from this episode:

 

[02:42] “if you can find a job that you like, you are going to be happier than 98% of the population!” My Father

 

[03:34] “there's a lot of people that drive around in maybe an expensive car and then pull into that one bedroom studio apartment in North Hollywood.” 

 

[04:10] “Would you rather make a million bucks a year doing something that you hate or would you rather open an espresso bar in Vietnam and just have a quality of life that is beautiful?”

 

[04:48] “the pressure to succeed, makes people miserable it makes them slaves to their careers it makes them slaves to their lifestyles”

 

[05:38] “expectations, ladies and gentlemen, are freaking toxic”

 

[09:11] “Everyone I met and meet will get amazing service professionally and personally, that's the key!”

 

[10:12] “get ready cause the next 18 months are gonna be like sitting in the ring with Mike Tyson, and every time you raise your head from the mat, Mike Tyson is going to smack you down again”

 

[12:55] “the moment you feel like you are working just for money, is the moment it's over!”

 

[14:39] “we got a long life, but it goes fast!”

 

Thanks for being here,

 ❤️ PL

How Do I Become A Luxury Real Estate Agent? | Magic Minute Season 3

Los Angeles is FULL of luxury properties, and a lot of real estate agents want in. How do you break into it? First, be patient. It's going to take a while. Expect to work, as an apprentice, for a successful real estate agent for several years. And, insert yourself into their circles. Country clubs, dinners, etc. Why? Because we sell trust, and you have to earn trust (especially when you're an agent buying or selling a multi-million dollar house).

In addition, you'll need to work harder than everyone else. It's competitive, but it pays off.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

Peter Lorimer’s Secrets to Property Success, From Photos to Software | Renting In America | USA Today

I was incredibly honored to be featured in the Future of Business and Tech, where I talked about a few of my favorite things: AirBnB, narratives, and efficiency.

I really enjoy - actually, I love - the personal nature that is AirBnB. But, in order for that to work, you have to create a narrative. What do you mean, Pete?!

By narrative I mean this: You need to tell a story. What kind of story does your short-term rental tell? Is it a block away from a downtown area with a bustling nightlife? Or is it a short car ride from a theme park?

I imagine those two AirBnBs will tell two different stories. Narrative.
I suggest, in order to tell a great story, hire professionals.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

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Via JEFFREY SOMERS, Future of Business and Tech  editorial@mediaplanet.com,

NEWS The short-term rental industry is exploding. For real estate guru Peter Lorimer, success means rejecting shortcuts and leveraging technology.

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Few people know more about real estate and the short-term rental industry than Peter Lorimer. The real estate legend now co-hosts “Stay Here” on Netflix with Genevieve Gorder, helping the famed interior designer transform drab Airbnb rentals into spectacular getaways.

“I think my favorite part of “Stay Here” is being able to immerse myself into the cultures of cities,” says Lorimer. “Which I think is the essence of Airbnb—we want to live like a local. It’s incredibly personal.”

Secrets to success

Lorimer has seen it all, and he has a simple recipe for short-term success.

“A word that I like to use in the show quite a lot is ‛narratives,’” he says. “Know what the story of the property is. Hire a professional photographer to capture the narrative. Thanks to technology, traditional real estate and short-term rentals have turned into real estate Tinder—please, please hire a professional cleaning crew!”

Technology also offers huge opportunities for landlords. “As a real estate professional, I’m all about ‛how can I utilize an hour?’” Lorimer points out. “Nothing replaces the personal touch, and if I’m knee-deep in paperwork, then I’m probably not going to be the most vibrant host that I could be. So if you can afford it—and really, you can’t afford not to—get Property Management Software (PMS) to streamline the day-to-day aspects.”

In addition to PMS, Lorimer stresses the importance of insurance. “Having insurance as a landlord is absolutely paramount—be very clear you’ll be using the insurance for an Airbnb, and get an umbrella policy. For renters, insurance adds an extra layer of comfort.”

Advice for newbies

For new landlords, Lorimer believes knowledge is power. “Data drives everything. Know your niche, who you’re going for.” He also believes in getting your hands dirty. “I’m a great believer in apprenticeships, and in getting things wrong so you know how to get them right. Do everything except the cleaning and the photography. Hands on is how you learn.”

It all comes back to that personal touch. “There are no shortcuts—clients will notice, and it will affect your ROI,” Lorimer warns. “Treat your guests like extended family or long-lost friend. That’s what they’re looking for, that’s what this industry was founded on.”

For Original Article Click HERE

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Technology vs Tradition / Peter Lorimer - The Creative Entrepreneur Podcast

Greetings and welcome to the Creative Entrepreneur Podcast, I am your host Peter Lorimer, former hit record producer, now host of the show Stay Here on Netflix and owner LA’s most creative Boutique real estate firm, PLG Estates.

The real estate world has changed and continues to change today. How do you keep up? In this podcast, I go over my top websites and tech tools that help me break through the competition.

However, keep in mind. 👇

It's all in the value-add. People are disinterested in your market reports. They want to see you, as a human. Those of us who dig in and figure out who we are as real estate agents and work to contribute to our value-add, we're safe.

It's attraction, not promotion. People want to see your face, hear your voice. Treat your clients like gold.

So without further ado, let’s dig into this week’s episode of The Creative Entrepreneur.

 

Golden Nuggets from this episode:

 

[05:56] “Everything is just attraction, not promotion”

[08:55] “Videos with captions get open 80% more” -> visit rev

[10:06] “get the ability to have much more produced videos on Facebook” -> visit belive.tv

[11:09] “ a website where you can compare and contrast, how your social media posts are doing up against other people” -> visit buzzsumo

[11:52] “create interesting kind of graphics, animations and info videos that just look

really nice” -> visit  playbuzz

[12:40] “have a Hitman on your website“-> visit hotjar

[13:25] “an app that allows you to film vertically that that will that will then automatically chop it into 15 second pieces” -> visit  Storeo - iTunes store

[14:05] “this is going to be the future of prospecting” -> visit chatfuel and manychat

[14:44] “People work with you because they like you”

[15:09] “We must be accountable to our clients at all times!”

Thank you for being here,

 ❤️ PL

Should I Invest In AirBnb's? - Magic Minute Season 3

Should you invest in AirBnBs? I'm a HUGE believer in these being an amazing investment. One thing to make sure of before you do, though. You need to make sure you're in an AirBnB friendly zone (check with the city council).

I believe this is the next wave for property investors. What are your thoughts on this, friends?

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

'Stay Here' Co-Host Peter Lorimer on the Netflix Home-Renovation Hit

I recently spoke with TV insider about some behind-the-scenes details of Stay Here and my tips and tricks associated with owning and operating an AirBnB. Our conversation ran the gamut--from how we chose the property owners down to working with the amazing Genevieve Gorder.

Written by Scott Fishman, TV Insider. For original article click HERE.

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Since Netflix’s series Stay Here dropped in August, co-host Peter Lorimer has gotten feedback from short-term rental owners who have applied tips from the show and turned their own struggling properties into profitable ventures.

The streaming service’s new foray into home reno sees the music producer-turned-entrepreneur and real-estate expert hitting the road with interior designer Genevieve Gorder to transform unique listings across the United States.

Here, the Brit transplant answers burning questions from filming the show and gives insight into taking advantage of the bustling Airbnb business.

Tell me about some of the success stories you’ve heard.

Peter Lorimer: There have been a lot of people reaching out saying similar stories to this: “Thank you so much. You’ve given me and my husband to get off our derriere and do the work. We’ve turned our potting shed into a small little Airbnb guest unit now, and we’re making x amount now. Thank you so much.”

I’ve got hundreds of those. The other one I get hit with every single day is: “Thank you so much for sharing all the secrets of the business through these tips because it was such a mystery to us. And in the end, you broke it down in a really digestible way."

People are taking those principles and applying it to their businesses and getting a return on their investments. So, "happy day," as they say in England.

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How did you go about choosing the properties throughout the United States? What criteria had to be met in choosing the ones we see on the series?

We spent three or four months going through loads and loads of properties. We had a ton of properties and a short list of, we’ll say 40 around the United States.

Through those we whittled them down to the eight that made the show. The criteria were the stories all had to be one-thousand-percent genuine. This doesn’t make them bad shows, but there are ones that are kind of helped along. Our show, everything was completely raw. We wanted to show genuine stories with the people in them, which is why I think a lot of them were so touching. Case in point was the people in Seattle. That wasn’t actually the first episode we shot. It just ended up being the lead on the series, because I think the story was so strong.

All of the people that owned the properties had to put significant money in. It wasn’t like the TV company came in and paid for everything at all. And in the case of at least half of them, it was touch-and-go. If it had gone horribly wrong, it would have been pretty catastrophic for them. Thankfully, everybody we worked with after we finished have gone severely into profit. Thank goodness for that.

That is the common misconception, that the production just went in there spending all this money. They basically have to go all in to make this work.

I think that was one of the most important ingredients of the show. If someone is getting their house completely renovated for free, there isn’t any fear. For some of these homeowners, it’s like when the circus comes to town. We come on a Monday and leave on a Friday. All of this work, and renovation and hammer-swinging, chainsaws go through their property. Then we are done on a Friday. Obviously, there is weeks of planning, so when we do roll up, we knew exactly what was going to happen.

With Gordy (Episode Four: Brooklyn Brownstone), you watch him in the beginning of the episode closely. He was kind of cagey and guarded. He was like, “What the heck is going on? I’m not sure if you need to do this.” Then, at the end of the episode his shoulders drop, he realizes we are going to deliver, and he essentially breathes a sigh of relief, because if things had gone wrong, that would have been famously catastrophic for him.

I think what is also great about the show is that you’re not only, “Hey, go somewhere else for a few days and come back to a new place.” These owners are heavily involved in the process.

Someone gave me a phrase a long time ago. They said to me, "When it comes to business, food always tastes better with friends." So, when it’s a collaborative effort. When everyone has their thumbprint on this business, because that is essentially what this is. It is a small, independent business that may be an extension of one person’s personal home or an investment property. It is a small micro-hotel where they are the GM of their own small business.

I think it’s not only the right thing to do, but I think it would be unnatural to just kind of send them away and bring them back for the reveal. We wanted them to see what we were doing every step of the way so that not only the owners of the property could see it, but also our audience can go on that journey with them.

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You mention all the owners are making a profit, but are there any plans to do a “Where are they now?” check-in with these folks?

It is the very same question I asked before we started the series. I think that the producers, George and Will, who I love, what they wanted to do for Season 2, which isn’t confirmed yet — but we are all crossing our fingers and toes on it — we would potentially begin Season 2 with a “What Happened in Season 1?”

The viewers got to see you and Genevieve immerse yourself in these settings. Like you going to New York for the first time and seeing the Biggie Smalls mural and how much that meant to you. What was it like working together as you journeyed across the country?

I got very lucky with Genevieve, because she is a veteran of television. She was very kind and sweet. Obviously, she knows her stuff inside and out. She is extraordinarily talented. Moreover, she was a really good mate to be on the road with. After we finished, we’d hang out off the set.

We couldn’t be more different. Genevieve comes from this design and very Americana world. I come from the world of house music and business and ROI and short-term rentals for a lot of celebrity clients here in L.A. We were essentially worlds apart, but I think my yin complimented her yang. I think that is why the chemistry was so great and why it worked.

If there is a Season 2, what are some places you want to go or see as a market of untapped potential? Would you want to take the show international?

Netflix, as you know, we love them, but they haven’t told us what their intentions are. We have spoken about an international season, which I feel is a no-brainer.

On a personal level, I would like to go to some markets that have emerged, but they aren’t fully at the top of the profit margin yet. Places like Nicaragua. There is some room left in Bali.

There are lots of areas of Europe now that could make it a potentially a good buy because Europe is suffering from the whole Brexit thing. It’s sending shockwaves through a lot of European markets, but I firmly believe in the real investor that when the market is in a bit of a spiral. You wait for it to drop.

I think one of the worst mistakes one can make is waiting to find the bottom. No successful investor I’ve worked with has bought right from the bottom and sold right at the top. You buy when it has gone down enough, and you believe the elevator will go back up past the point you bought significantly.

I feel a lot of Europe is like that right now, because I think Brexit will ultimately at some point get repealed, or/and Europe will stabilize again, thus the market would begin to rally. At that point you’ve bought a great investment. You can charge great rents that will put you significantly into profit.

Stay Here is streaming now on Netflix


Being Motivated By Failure / Pete Lorimer - The Creative Entrepreneur Podcast

Greetings and welcome to the Creative Entrepreneur Podcast, I am your host Pete Lorimer, former hit record producer, now host of the show Stay Here on Netflix and owner LA’s most creative Boutique real estate firm, PLG Estates.

This podcast ventures into one of my favorite things to talk about: failure. Failure, as far as I'm concerned, is my friend. It used to be my enemy, I was terrified of it. Now, I see it as a way to reset my compass. I don't run away from failure, because I have and still do learn from it. Don't listen to the debating society. Dig in. Don't make it personal. Fail on your own terms and watch you and your business grow. So without further ado, let’s dig into this week’s episode of The Creative Entrepreneur.

Golden Nuggets from this episode:

[01:31] “Success is moving from failure to failure with no lack of enthusiasm” - Winston Churchill

[01:57] “Failure is actually my friend” - Peter Lorimer

[02:31] “Success is Not final” - Winston Churchill

[08:19] “Failure isn't the end it's a recalibration of Direction” - Peter Lorimer

[09:05] “Don't make it personal even if it is.” - Peter Lorimer

[11:47] “Thoughts become Things! If you think you're going to fail all the time, guess what? you are going to fail!” - Peter Lorimer

[12:40] “Don't look for approval!” - Peter Lorimer

[13:22] “If you want loyalty get a dog” - Glenn Danzig

[14:07] “When you play in the middle, when you play it safe you are betraying the future you!” - Peter Lorimer

[17:34] “Failure can come really quick, Success takes a long time!” - Peter Lorimer

Thank you for being here,

 ❤️ PL

How to Obtain Life Goals - The Roadmap | Peter Lorimer Mantra

It's not all about the hustle or grind. It's about LIFE. I'm interested in working to live, not living to work.

Here are my tricks for maximizing my time and getting the most out of it:

4:30: ⏰ wake up. I HATE waking up this early. But I do it.

5:00-6:00 am: I plan my entire day. Tip: I outsource tasks such as laundry, groceries, etc. to maximize efficiency.

6:00-7:00 am: Gym

7:00-8:30 am: Prospect. Every 👏 Single 👏 Day 👏

8:30-10:00 am: PLG emails

👆That's it friends. I bank my hours. I get up at 4:30 am and start my day. Think about it... I've worked half a day before the work day starts. If you add that extra banked time up, you've worked an extra 2.5 days a week.

What can you do with that extra time? Whatever you want! Use it to get more work done, or use it to do what YOU want without feeling guilty.

I'm not interested in watching my life blow by because I'm working all the time. I'm also not interested in becoming wealthy at the cost of someting else.

My extra chunk of time in the morning is how I obtain my goals. It gives me an extra day or two. It's how I get ahead, and it can help you, too.

Thanks for being here,

PL

How to Successfully Cold Call - Magic Minute Season 3

Well, you all know how I feel about this. If you're cold calling - God bless you. People build careers on calling complete strangers, but that's the last thing I want to do. There's a multitude of ways to meet buyers OTHER than cold-calling. Instead, try things like sitting every freaking open house. What are your thoughts on this? Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

The Art of Work-Life Balance Part 2 | Pete Lorimer Mantra

It's time for PART 2 of The Art of Work-Life Balance 👏

So many entrepreneurial mentors will tell you the "deal" or the "money" is what you should strive for. I'm an entrepreneur, and I don't necessarily subscribe to this idea.

What drives me is not money. I'm in business to improve my life, not just my bank balance. I know I need time to decompress and spend time with my family. That makes me a better worker.

👉Calendaring

I don't just calendar our work life. I also calendar our personal life. Dinner, family time - everything is mapped out and goes into the calendar. The most important things in the calendar never get moved. Make sure you calendar your personal time and make it immovable. I used to feel guilty when I had free time. Do you feel that way? Book something else in. Fill your free time with something productive and worthwhile.

👉Banking Hours

I bank my hours. Example: If I get started at work early, I can bank time for later. Tip: multi-task. A personal example - I needed to work out and my son wanted some "boy time", so I went on a hike with my boy.

👉Know Your Value Per Hour

Cindy and I made the decision (best decision we ever made). We hired a housekeeper. We also have someone wash our cars. And I now have someone come to the house and cut mine and my son's hair. It might seem like a lot, but I save so much cumulative time by doing these things.

"I will have a life when I retire" NOPE. Not me. I want to spend quality time NOW. It's just as important as work time. And it can especially work if we bank hours by getting to work earlier sometimes.

I believe you can have your cake and eat it, too. I want to enrich my life by working with people I love and adore, and spending time with my family that I love and adore.

At the end of the day, I'm not gonna want 1 million dollars, I'm going to want time with my family.

One fuels the other. Life is short.

Life is really short.

Thank you for being here,

 ❤️ PL

#MCCLive with Alyssa Hellman & Peter Lorimer

I recently spoke with Alyssa Hellman on #MCCLive about my Stay Here experience.

The first day of shooting, we were on the set in Washington D.C. I was pretty nervous. I expected maybe a little coaching... NOPE. And here's what I learned from that: trust your gut and what you know. Put differently: You're a professional, PROFESS! This goes back to confidence and not listening to the voice of fear. Let your actions speak for you. Sometimes, when you're thrown into the fire, you have no choice. Sink or swim.

Television is really hard and there are really long hours. It's complex, I love it, and there's definitely more coming in television for me-- but real estate is a tough industry to leave and I'm happy to be here.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete

How to Take Risk in Your Business Without Fear / Pete Lorimer - The Creative Entrepreneur Podcast

Greetings and welcome to the Creative Entrepreneur Podcast, I am your host Pete Lorimer, former hit record producer, now host of the show Stay Here on Netflix and owner LA’s most creative Boutique real estate firm, PLG Estates.

This podcast dives into something a lot of entrepreneurs suffer with--we become trapped by fear and start underestimating ourselves. We talk ourselves out of 90% of our ideas. Those ideas you see happen? Those ideas come to fruition through relentless, persistent action that don't listen to those dream-crushing voices. There's no middle, there's no playing it safe. You're either moving closer or further from your goal. We need to nurture our ideas. You have nothing to lose except time. So without further ado, let’s dig into this week’s episode of The Creative Entrepreneur.

Golden Nuggets from this episode:

[04:27] “I would think 90% of entrepreneurial dreams we talk ourselves out of the first 10 minutes.”

[05:44] “most of you have had breakfast, most of you live in the United States, so guess what team, you already won right you already won!”

[06:42] “I welcomed failing fast” 


[07:17] “There isn't a playing it safe you’re either going forwards or backwards”


[09:23] “The only commodity of value we have in our life is time”


[11:06] “Unless you have a white hot burning desire to become a director it's not gonna happen” Martin Scorsese


[12:08] “When you ask people for advice, maybe 5 out of 10 maybe 6 out of 10 will sit you down and spill their guts and then invite you back”

  

Thank you for being here,

 ❤️ PL

How Do I Make a Small House Look Bigger? - Magic Minute Season 3

How do you make a small house look bigger? It generally comes down to two things... color and clutter.

👉 Color: If you're in a house with non-neutral walls, especially if it's under 1000 square feet, paint it all white. I paint everything Swiss Coffee (my favorite white), the ceilings white, and the woodwork white semigloss.

👉 Clutter: Get rid of the spare clutter, the photos, the extra junk. Stick it all in the garage.

Do these things and you'll make the house like bright, airy, and bigger!

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete.

The Art of Work-Life Balance | Pete Lorimer Mantra

The entrepreneurial wave that's taken over tells you to work from 6 am to 11 pm every day. Not me.

For me, my personal life is enhanced by my professional life - and vice versa.

Goals outside of work fuel my work. I work long hours so I that I'm able to create memories our family can look back on. I don't want to be counting $100 bills when I'm old, I want to be watching these stupid videos I created of my family making wonderful memories. That's my big WHY.

I'm giving you permission to have a "why" that's outside of business.

Tips on handling work so you can carve out time for YOU:

BOUNDARIES. This one's number one for a reason. When you work for yourself, you feel like you are always on call. But that's not true. If a client texts me after hours, I respond and say I'll get back to them tomorrow. They appreciate the response and my family appreciates the attention.

Calendaring. I calendar everything. This gives me sanity, removes chaos, and allows me to know what I should be doing at each and every moment. On that note, start work at the same time every day. I start at 10 am every single day - no matter what. This is massively important.

Say no. If a client calls you at 8 pm at night or 8 am in the morning when you've planned something for yourself or your family, say "I have an important family event I can't miss, I'd be happy to go at a later time (and you can even give them times to choose from here)." Again, as long as you always respond, your client stays happy.

Prioritize your day. What's your time worth? Real estate agents try to do everything, and that's just not possible. Delegate!

Don't use your office as a crutch. Your dining room is the best office in the world. There are no distractions. At the office, there's meetings, chatter, etc. These things can all be great, but they can also be a time suck.

Overcome procrastination. How? Just do it! Just do it right then and there. If you have the ability, do it now. If it's on your list, do it in the order that it's in.

I challenge you to write down a goal. It can be a vacation, an experience, or tickets to a show--meaningful stuff. Write it down. So that when you look back at your life, you think "that was awesome." We have to do things outside our industry.

This world is a beautiful, fat, juicy place full of jewels and I want to consume as much of it as I can.

Thanks for being here. ❤️ Pete.

Joe Fairless Podcast | From Successful Producer To Successful Real Estate Investor & Agent with Peter Lorimer

I recently had the opportunity to chat on Joe Fairless's podcast, Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever. We spent time talking about how my background in the music industry influences my success and choices in real estate.

As most of you may already know, my background was not at all real estate. I became a record producer at age 16. When you're a DJ, you have to know what's going to move the floor. When you're a record producer, you have to know what's going to move the floor a year from now. My ability and training in technology and trend-spotting have turned out to be extremely helpful in real estate.

My approach to real estate has always been driven by technology and social media.

I think what separated me from new agents, in the beginning, was work ethic. In the music industry, you put your heart and your soul and your life into something that may never see the light of the day. You have to outwork everyone else in the room.

But the cornerstone of my success was due to the fact that I was okay with taking risks when it came to social media. I didn't have someone else craft my digital identity, I made myself the brand. When I was a record producer, one of the biggest hits I ever had was when I did a project just for me. I created something that I loved and didn't care what others thought about it. So in social media, I haven't pandered to anyone. We have always danced to the beat of our own drum. We look for white space, for opportunity.

The real estate world has absolutely reset. We are currently watching the end of an era. If you aren't crafting your own digital identity-- you're dead. You can NOT leave it up to your company to do that for you.

If you don't blend in, you stand out.

Thanks for being part of the rebellion and for being here ❤️ Pete